Ways of Unblocking a “Writing Block”

Remember those torturing periods when you cannot start writing an assignment, feeling embarrassed, hesitated and STUCK?! Sounds familiar? There was a post about procrastination and ways of battling it, but we should face another “academic demon” that wraps our effort in the start of doing assignments, and i.e. “writing block”. Its Russian equivalent sounds like “creativity crisis”, which precisely depicts the state of a student (or writer) as an inability to start or continue his writing work. Even if this phenomenon seems barely defeatable, any attempt is a chance to push it away. At least, there won’t be a solution without any effort.
Notably, it’s crucial to identify a reason for your writing block. They may be several at once: fear, perfectionism, devoid of ideas or loss of focus. When you are aware of a source of your writing block, there are more possible chances to find a solution for struggling with it.
Let me share my tips on how to overcome a writing block and end up with productive paperwork.

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Photo credit: http://www.openlettersmonthly.com/likefire/sven-birkerts-on-writers-block

First, take a break and focus on any physical activity. Sounds trite, but it works! Your mind needs a short-term getaway from a continuous overwork. My father always insisted on a systematic shuffle of mental activity with physical work and I do cleaning a house, gardening systematically along with doing my paperwork.

The second recommendation sounds similar to a previous one, although it is about looking for inspiration. Try to change your focus from your assignment because too much concentration causes a deficiency of diverse ideas or vice versa overload of ideas that enable mess in your mind. It is quite useful to draw your attention to those everyday activities, which you like doing on a regular basis, e.g. surfing social networks, watching favorite TV shows, reading a newspaper or visiting galleries (but do not be stuck there too!). There is also a chance of emergence of an answer for your questions from assignment or ideas for your writing work.

Photo credit: http://cuddlesandrage.com/2014/writers-block/

Finally, become an illiterate, grammarian-free writer… for a while. The process of correcting mistakes through continuous editing your paragraphs and concentration on your stylistic errors results in a waste of much time. Ideas and your thoughts matter more than stylistically polished structures, so it is beneficial to start put your raw ideas first with a later proof check of your writing paper.

Hope, my tips on how to get over writing block will be useful for someone who deals with it. What are your suggestions and experiences in overcoming writing block?

5 thoughts on “Ways of Unblocking a “Writing Block”

  1. I enjoy posts that focus on overcoming daily challenges.This one is not an exception.

    Instead of offering a piece of advice myself, I’d like to add another reason to why one may face this “wall” in writing. It is when you stop caring and this apathy keeps you from even starting to do your assignment.
    Usually, I just force myself to “birth” something that looks like a paper at least worth my professor’s time and move on.
    I wonder if an effective method to motivate to write and keep me going until the end exists.

    Like

  2. I read a lot of articles and blogs, watched dozens of vlogs and TED Talks about strategies on how to get your work done in time; almost everyone says: “Take a 5-minute break after every 30mins/1 hour”. I tried. It didn’t work. At least for me. Now I divide my time according to the number of the sections of my assignment: if it is an essay I set my alarm for 5 different times (introduction, 3 aspects, conclusion) and try to finish writing the particular part until its established time. If I have extra minutes, I rest; if I don’t, I move to the next part. It may sound exhausting, but it works for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Zarina, your blog stopped and made me comment it. So I think as a writer you could choose an interesting topic, which attracts a reader. Thank you!
    As a person who suffers from procrastination and tries to overcome it, I was curious to read your blog. To be honest, before I thought that “writing block” and “procrastination” are the same things, however now I can see differences between them.
    It it difficult to give an advice to others, when you are a procrastinator yourself. I just want to highlight your last recommendation (to start writing anything), which I consider the most useful. I think that’s because in my blog about overcoming procrastination there was a piece of advice “Don’t be a perfectionist”, which means you have to start writing even with mistakes. To my mind, the words of Jodi Picoult “You can edit a bad page, but you can’t edit a blank page” is applicable here as well.

    Like

  4. I have to agree with your peers in the comment section who found this post engaging and worth reading. I particularly enjoyed the cartoons you choose to illustrate the post. As an English teacher, I was nodding along in agreement through most of the text, but especially at this line: “Ideas and your thoughts matter more than stylistically polished structures, so it is beneficial to start put your raw ideas first with a later proof check of your writing paper.” This is something that many teachers do not agree with, though, and may feel the opposite need to correct every article and comma. In honor of those teachers, here are a couple minor ways your can polish your text:

    I do cleaning a house, (housecleaning? housework?)
    There is also a chance of emergence of an answer for your questions from assignment or ideas for your writing work. (nominalization wordiness)
    Hope, my tips on how to get over writing block (strange comma, like you are addressing someone named Hope. Try a regular subject-verb combination with no comma).
    5/5

    Like

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