‘The Value of Education’ for Girls by Aiganym Sadykova (deconstruction)

Have you ever thought what role did your school education play in your life? And to what extent did it influence your worldview? Now pretend you have no access to any school throughout your life due to numerous reasons: parents do not give a permission (sounds silly, but on the other side of this planet some people, particularly, girls do face this problem), financial crash in the country, natural disaster, isolated location, etc. or even worse, schools are prohibited in your region (!). There is a chance you will be surrounded only by family in the grip of traditions and customs with a strict order to follow them. Pretty hard, isn’t it? I couldn’t even imagine that such scenario is quite possible even with the existence of the educational system, accomplished schools in a country with a prosperous economy nowadays. However, young speaker Aiganym shares her view about the existence of feminist discrimination in the country in a video below from a perspective of a schoolchild.

As a student of an Almaty international school she discovers that girls even with an opportunity to have an education are constantly imposed to a number of such social cliché as beauty standards, maternity at the cost of academic advancement, so forth, promoted actively by adverts, mass media. She supports that argument with a personal example from her own life by showing photographs during her teens when she was obsessed with the idea to lose weight to be suitable for beauty requirements. As a result, happiness wasn’t at the end of that story as well as a satisfaction. Likewise, many women encounter difficulties in seeking satisfaction because of being stigmatized and lack of discoveries and beloved activities in their lives. In other cases, ladies cannot even identify a source of their depression.

Also, the speaker gives a name to the problem that causes women’s unfavorable position in Kazakhstani society. It is a mentality. She calls for a change in a view of education not as a period in early school life, or a place for showing off someone’s virtues, but as an opportunity to gain a knowledge and think critically. She contends critical thinking is just the ticket that will allow changing a mindset directed to the development of human capital as a whole.

As for me, I totally support the stance Ayganym keeps. Women should not lose their intellectual potential because of stigmas on the roles of females in the society. It is crucial to appreciate what society can give us, make many efforts and keep being inquisitive for the betterment of our life.

 

3 thoughts on “‘The Value of Education’ for Girls by Aiganym Sadykova (deconstruction)

  1. First a grammar point: “Have you ever thought what role did your school education play in your life?” This is an indirect question and so does not need an auxiliary verb: “what role your school played”

    Then the more substantial points about deconstruction. Since this is your first attempt at an argument deconstruction, I’ll go easy on you. A few things your post achieves:

    1) You identify her central claims clearly and correctly: 1) “Girls even with an opportunity to have an education are constantly imposed to a number of such social cliché as beauty standards [and] maternity at the cost of academic advancement”, and 2) “Critical thinking is just the ticket that will allow changing a mindset directed to the development of human capital as a whole.”

    2) You point out the basic source of her evidence: “personal [examples] from her own life”

    3) You state your position in relation to hers: “I totally support the stance Ayganym [takes/adopts]”.

    A few things your post is lacking:
    1) A critical view of her position. Would the argument be stronger with more/different evidence? Are there overgeneralizations or limitations to her claims or reasons? Is she biased or subjective?
    2) In this kind of writing, it is less important to start with such an elaborate context-building paragraph. Jump into the analysis sooner!
    3) More “provocateur” questions that came to mind: Isn’t it over-simplistic to blame this entire issue on “mentality”? Why not look at the question more systematically (the role of school, the role of family, the role of government) in this issue? Then the solutions could be more concrete and less vague, more practical and less idealistic.
    4) Maybe all of these points are over-critical. After all, she is a high-school student giving a rather talented public speech in front of a large audience. Nevertheless, I hope you would examine her argument more closely before jumping to a natural conclusion that you “totally support her”. Here would be my closing sentence: “Despite relying primarily on personal experience and therefore presenting a more subjective argument, Ayganym makes a strong case for inquisitiveness and critical thinking as counterbalances to traditional social pressures. As a young woman struggling critically–and publicly–with difficult questions, she is an inspirational example for others to follow.”

    4/5

    Like

  2. I would like to begin with the position of women in history, politics, and even in some religions. It is forbidden for women’s voices to be heard. For instance, in Christianity it is said that “it is a shame for woman to speak in the church” (1 Corinthians 14:34-35); in the past women did not have a right to vote on elections; in some developing countries like Pakistan girls do not have a right to be educated at schools, and so on. This list can be fulfilled with many other examples of women’s status in society. Frankly, I am glad that there are many young women figthing for women’s right. One of the examples is Malala Yousafzai who is a Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest Nobel Prize laureate. The local Taliban (a terrorist group) banned girls from attending school. Malala’s advocacy had grown into an international movement with the price of her own life. That kind of women inspire to be strong and be fearless against men’s prejudice and attitude towrds women’s weakness. Physical weakness.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Bota for reminding us of Malala. She is one of those wonderful role models that inspire females all around the globe to fight for women’s rights nowadays. I do strongly believe in equality for all human beings in the nearest future, even if it may sound naive. The growth of feministic ideas and wave of emancipatory movements against discrimination during last two decades only affirm my belief.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s