The world has changed. The way we educate our children should too.

 

stock-photo-the-saying-or-motto-change-is-difficult-not-changing-is-fatal-with-words-stuck-onto-a-bulletin-111462035
photo credits to https://www.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/saying-motto-change-difficult-not-changing-111462035?src=liJpSuVV6vqDlMzG-jOKKQ-1-41

 

Just ask yourself: should the education be reshaped? Even though the answer will vary from person to person, it is impossible to respond unless we ask ourselves what kind of world we are going in.

Imagine how the factory looked like in the XIX century and how it looks now. The same for the transport system or the bank. We will see massive changes. The only domain that looks the same as in the XIX century is a school. A class where the children sit in front of the teacher in rows and study the subjects according to the curriculum, which, in its essence, was also created in the XIX century. Obviously, this model is obsolete. But how should it change?

Now we observe and expect that the total number of changes in the world of the near future – technological, political, social – will be so great that we simply cannot understand what we are preparing the current first-graders. Thus, the first thing we have to say to ourselves: guys, we need to prepare a person so that he can react as much as possible to the challenges in a changing world. We are moving towards a period when people will constantly be “scared”. For instance, how should one cope with the news that his/her domain no longer exists, that it was replaced by robots? Or that there have been such political changes that his/her country does not exist anymore. In theory, considering unstable political issues in the global arena, this may happen to many of us when we will suddenly find ourselves nowhere and have to adapt to the changed conditions swiftly.

The problem of the current school is that it was created under the prevailing industrial model of the society of the XIX century. At that time, it was necessary to have a lot of workers who obey the boss, do what they are told, do not go beyond job descriptions and according to the template can perform the prescribed tasks. Preferably highly specialised. And in a world of uncertainty – this is the riskiest thing that you can think of. The school educates discipline, submission, lack of creativity, application of templates. That is directly contradictory to what we are moving to.

So, by being a part of something revolutionary in our country, how do you think how the education and schools, in particular, should be reshaped?

P.S. this blog post is dedicated to my grandfather who used to say that the more schools we have, the brighter future of the country will be. I love you, I remember you, grandpa. Hoping that one day your “dream schools” come true…

1 thought on “The world has changed. The way we educate our children should too.

  1. Nicely done, Uaxi.

    Your talk echoes a lot of the sentiment presented by Ken Robinson’s “Changing Education Paradigms talk (https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_changing_education_paradigms) or Prince Ea’s “I sued the school system” video that circulated social media a while back (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqTTojTija8). Your writing is quite accurate and smooth, but I would suggest adding some more concrete dialogue with texts or other authors like those to strengthen your position. Despite this, and the stylistic faux pa of using a shutterstock image with the watermark, I found your post quite insightful and engaging.

    I, for one, think that schools will eventually follow the model that modern medicine is adopting, where progress and assessment is highly personalized, perhaps to the point that students no longer study in groups together by year, but move through modules at different speeds and at different times.

    (4.5/5)

    Like

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