Literature Review in my research study

Literature-Review

Image credit https://www.researchgate.net/post/Does_anyone_use_literature_mapping_in_their_literature_review

The process of reviewing the literature is one of the crucial parts in research work. It gives directions to you further research and provides a broad understanding on whether to investigate a particular topic or not. As noted by Vickers and Offredy (n.d.) literature review ‘provides an up-to-date understanding of the subject and its significance to (your) practice’. Indeed, access to international researchers’ ideas, understandings, methods and findings gives us an opportunity to develop a complex set of skills as a young researcher. Once, on the course of “Educational reforms in Kazakhstan” our professor Sulushash Kerimkulova said that ten resources are enough for the final paper. All of us were so relieved, as it seemed not so much for us. However, after a while, the professor continued that, in order to find these ten resources, we need to read hundreds. A Russian researcher Sergey Vavilov agrees with it and says that a modern man stands in front of the Himalayas libraries in the position of the gold prospector, who must find a grain of gold in the mass of sand. So, finding a relevant literature is a hard work and needs a strong will-power, however, the more literature you reviewed, the richer and more resourceful will be your research.

My thesis is aimed to investigate the competence of primary year teachers on teaching in inclusive classrooms. In order to receive a broader range of teachers’ experiences and better understand the challenges they face in teaching students with special educational needs I decided to review studies conducted not only in Kazakhstan, but also discussions of the international literature of teachers’ competence in inclusive classrooms. This topic has been investigated a lot and it was easy for me to study it from different perspectives. However, in order not to be buried under the mass of literature I found, I decided to allocate the primary and secondary sources into different folders, such as “Kazakhstani experience” and “Other countries”. Moreover, I designed a mind map where I wrote the authors’ names and date, their key findings and methodology they used. The picture above illustrates exactly how I see the process of reviewing relative literature on the investigated topic. It helped me to see the parallels of different researchers work and then to do my own parallel. For instance, I cited Yeun, Westwood and Wong (2004, as cited in Frolin, 2010) who claims that as teaching is getting ‘progressively more multifaceted’ (p.161) a teacher has totally different role in a regular classroom, recent studies demonstrate that a lot of classroom teachers are not confident in integrated lessons with special-needs students and do not reflect willingness to have inclusive education in their lessons. Indeed, from my personal conversation with the teacher, who teaches a student with cerebral palsy as me, says that teachers are more confident in teaching students with SEN and have more positive attitude when they are aware of appropriate teaching approach and have enough skills and knowledge. A proper literature review will lead to a good comparison for your own research findings (Vickers & Offredy, n.d.).

As for challenges in my thesis now, I found difficult to paraphrase correctly. It needs a lot academic skills and proofreading. Moreover, literature reviewing requires an analytical view, which is, in my opinion, also the skill of professional researchers. The Literature Review in my thesis is divided into three subtopics so far, which are teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education in Kazakhstan, teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education in other countries, and teachers’ competence in teaching inclusive classrooms. Now I am working on enriching the last subtopic, and I would like to add more findings of other international researchers and their methodologies and while reading develop my own analytical view.

References

Vickers P., Offredy M., (n.d.). Writing a research proposal. Retrieved from http://www.health.herts.ac.uk/immunology/Web%20programme%20-%20Researchhealthprofessionals/

Yeun, M., Westwood P. & Wong G., (2004). Meeting the needs of students with specific learning difficulties in the mainstream education system: data from primary school teachers in Hong Kong. International Journal of Special Education.

2 thoughts on “Literature Review in my research study

  1. Thanks, Sulubike,

    This is a strong post, as it very clearly outlines your goals, strategies and challenges. Thanks for sharing! I would only ask you to proofread one more time. Can you find the sentence errors below?

    In order to receive a broader range of teachers’ experiences and better understand the challenges they face in teaching students with special educational needs I decided to review studies conducted not only in Kazakhstan, but also discussions of the international literature of teachers’ competence in inclusive classrooms. (run-on sentence)

    For instance, I cited Yeun, Westwood and Wong (2004, as cited in Frolin, 2010) who claims that as teaching is getting ‘progressively more multifaceted’ (p.161) a teacher has totally different role in a regular classroom, recent studies demonstrate that a lot of classroom teachers are not confident in integrated lessons with special-needs students and do not reflect willingness to have inclusive education in their lessons. (comma splice)

    I found __ difficult to paraphrase correctly. (missing pronoun)
    4.5/5

    Like

  2. Dear Sulubike,

    I think you have put in a fantastic effort in writing this post: everything is clear and well connected. I especially want to highlight connection between your ideas and sentences which I think is done very well. Your text is coherent and easy to follow.
    I agree that the ability to paraphrase is not so simple as it may seem at first glance. Personally, I try to read a text as much as I need to understand its key idea/s, and while reading I make some notes of the key ideas. Then, I start writing what an author wanted to say in my own words without looking at the original text using only my notes. Here is the main thing is to resist the temptation to look through the original text over and over again because of a danger of using same words and sentence constructions.
    Next thing I would like to touch upon is your approach to use mind map. Do you use several mind maps for different subtopics in your literature review? I found this approach very useful and want to use it myself, however I am not sure how.

    Like

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