The research author I aspire to become alike to

Once you have outstepped the threshold of academic world, you ought to adhere to certain guidelines and even adjust some of your habits. If prior to becoming affiliated with academic world you are free to choose what to write or read, after entering scholarly society you do not have this luxury. The longer you study, the deeper you delve into the ocean of scientific knowledge. Consequently, you start to have certain preferences or disfavors. The scholar I personally respect and admire for his scholarly approach, uncomplicated manner of writing and deep knowledge of the context is

Peeter Mehisto.                                       Peeter - CLILpalace11-2008

Photo credit to http://clil-cd.ecml.at/Team/Teammember3/tabid/940/language/en-GB/Default.aspx

Prominent in the sphere of education as an author of books and articles, a trainer of teachers and administrators involved in the implementation of CLIL and an educator Peeter Mehisto gained recognition across continents. His vast experience in education first as a practitioner and later as a researcher enabled him to become an accomplished writer. Peeter Mehisto’s works possess certain distinctive features one of which is simple yet academic style of writing. His sentences lack complex structures or complicated words, though they still are not simple. While reading his papers you do not need to stop every now and then to check the meaning of words. Your reading goes smoothly and uninterruptedly. In my opinion, he manages to do that because he precisely knows the audience he writes for. Another characteristic of Peeter Mehisto’s writing is strong understanding of the context he writes about. Judging by his papers on a number of issues in Kazakhstan, it is evident that he navigates very confidently in the local context. Thus, he accomplishes to write thorough works as if he is an insider who knows all the peculiarities and addresses them meticulously in his writing.

What is the key of writing scholarly works in an uncomplicated manner? Firstly, I believe, is rich experience in the field you are writing about. Secondly, is clear vision of the audience you are aiming your paper at. Thirdly, is broad knowledge of the context and the problem you are discussing. Peeter Mehisto’s writing is a great example which incorporates all this features and serves as a model to follow.

3 thoughts on “The research author I aspire to become alike to

  1. Dear Lenera, this is a good description of the research author admiration. Dr. Mehisto has impacted greatly to the academic world of multiligualism and has got a vigorous research experience for eliciting the latent levels of multilingual education in the country and counseling for developing better practices. You have mentioned his papers affilited to Kazakhstani context. What issues has Dr. Mehisto been dwelling on? How did they impacted on the development of multilingual education in the country?

    Like

  2. Dear Assel,

    I appreciate your answer to my post and the thought-provoking questions you asked. Dr. Peeter Mehisto has been actively engaged in the development of the trilingual education and implementing the best practices of CLIL in our education system. Relying on his vast experience and excellent expertise in the field, Dr. Mehisto provided practical advice on developing curricula, avoiding some possible issues that may arise, and introducing CLIL into our education.

    Kind regards,

    Lenera.

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  3. Thanks, Lenera.

    I am impressed by your attention to sentence variety and visual, metaphoric language:

    “Prominent in the sphere of education as an author of books and articles, a trainer of teachers and administrators involved in the implementation of CLIL and an educator Peeter Mehisto gained recognition across continents.”

    “The longer you study, the deeper you delve into the ocean of scientific knowledge.”

    Keep it up! (5/5)

    Liked by 1 person

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